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@Diana Thomas

the swarm will leave the hive around noon and they will have found a new home before sunset.

This is also the reason a beekeeper only enters a hive after noon, just to precvent a swarm is created because of the beekeeper
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[quote]ratshah63
about 1 year ago
Is there only 1 queen bee to a hive? If this is so how does the queen bees moving to another hive affect the first hive?

From what I understand when the hive splits but temporarily clusters on a tree branch not too far from the original hive. How is this temporary place selected?[/quote]

dear Ratshah. normally there is only one queen in the hive. If they decide to move the queen and workers prepare 3-8 new queens. If the first larve is capped the queen leaves with have the hive population to a new home.

after 7 days the first new queens uncaps her cocoon and present herself to the workers. she makes a noise with het wings and legs. Other queens who aren't ready yet to leave the cocoon try to answer and the sound is different but everybody knows the're more queens.

If the draft is good and the population is big enough she will also leave at noon with again half the poplation of the hive( virgin swarm). This continues untill splitting is no further possible without the risk of getting a to small poplationto survive.

if the risk is too high, the not born queens will be destroyed by the workers.
Everythig is based on surviving and growing to keep the species alive.
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I'm working on setting up a human society based on the systems used in nature by ants and bees and others. I believe such a system will quickly create vastly superior technology and quickly solve all currently known problems of mankind. I believe it will out compete current society. It has the potential to end poverty and bring about World Peace.

You can find out more about it at my websites:
http://teamworldpeace.org
http://conceivia.com
http://gaia-god.com
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Hello frens,

If any of you are wondering about where/how to buy these honeycomb cores then please contact me..

Neal
CA composites
neal@cacomposites.com
www.cacomposites.com
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Dear AskNature.org,

Do you know about some applications of this knowledge about WIND TURBINES where icing is a problem too at cold climate areas?

Thank You in advance!
I look forward to your answer!

BR,
dopike89
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This is why I do not like using secondary references as the only support for a strategy. You can't find the original research unless you have the book. I haven't been able to look inside, Animal Architecture by Juhani Pallasmaa (1995). But I found another book chapter that illuminates further:

Hermani H. 1979. Defensive Mechanisms in the Social Hymenoptera. In: Social Insects, Volume 2. Academic Press. 506 pp.
“Nests of Metapolybia blend in with lichen-covered rocks and trees that surround them, while Leipomeles spp. And Parachartergus fulgidipennis apply lichen and moss to the regular nest construction material (Evan and Eberhard, 1970). Metapolybia pediculate includes muscovite in the walls of its nest, which Rau and Rau (1970) referred to as windows.”

Rau P, Rau N. 1918. Wasp Studies Afield. Dover:NY.
http://www.forgottenbooks.org/books/Wasp_Studies_Afield_1000172390
https://archive.org/details/waspstudiesafiel00raupuoft
The wasp, Metapolybia pediculata, is not in the Index, nor in the list of illustrations. I checked the taxonomic name, and it is correct, without any synonyms.
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Now I find some photos by searching on Metapolybia pediculata nest.
It appears there is another wasp that makes nests similarly: Stelopolybia cf pediculata
https://www.flickr.com/photos/29697818@N03/3129106560/in/set-72157611459883693
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Wow. A photo!
http://uwbrus.wordpress.com/2010/07/14/afternoon-excursion/dsc04143/
This is one of those critter mysteries that needs researched!
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I stumbled on this webpage when searching for a picture for the nest of this wasp. Actually, more than 20 years ago, a similar hypothesis about the purpose of the windows in these remarkable nests had been mentioned by a renowned ecologist, Nobel Prize laureate Karl von Frisch, in his book Animal Architecture (ISBN 0-15-107251-5). I am surprised, and a little disappointed, that after so many years there still no nice and free picture of the nest available online.
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greetings
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hello folks
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Liverpool Personal Injury Solicitor
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Phentermine was used specifically in diet pills and weight loss supplements because it is supposed to make you lose weight. You're supposed to use it in combination with good diet and exercise to experience the best results. Today, we are going to look at how effective this substance actually works to help you lose weight. The way it is said to work is by making you feel less hungry or suppressing your appetite.

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Phentermine was used specifically in diet pills and weight loss supplements because it is supposed to make you lose weight. You're supposed to use it in combination with good diet and exercise to experience the best results. Today, we are going to look at how effective this substance actually works to help you lose weight. The way it is said to work is by making you feel less hungry or suppressing your appetite.
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As of 2014 April 25: http://www.groasis.com/en
Still going strong!
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You have Buprestidae as a label on the photo of Carabus.
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This guy elucidates the issue quite nicely in my mind: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxrLYv0QXa4
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govaj
8 months ago
This comment was removed by a AskNature editor for the following reason:
perceived SPAM
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