Innovators are full of questions.Nature has answers.
EXPLORE BY FUNCTION

  

  • Strategy

Abrupt flight patterns help evade predators: moths

Loading...

Emperor Gum Moth / Fir0002 / LicenseGFDL - Gnu Free Document License

Moths detect bat calls and avoid predation using sudden drops and weaving flight patterns.

FUNCTION
Summary
"Many species of moth can hear bats coming by listening in to their ultrasonic echolocation calls. They can therefore escape before being caught. Once the bat is within approximately 20 feet (6m), moths take abrupt evasive action, either by folding up their wings and dropping down out of the bat's flight path, or by embarking on a random, weaving flight that the bat cannot follow." (Shuker 2001:23)

Watch Video
About the inspiring organism
Med_800pxemperor_gum_moth Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera

Learn more at EOL.org
Organism/taxonomy data provided by:
Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: 2008 Annual Checklist


Bioinspired products and application ideas

Application Ideas: Improved collision-avoidance technologies.

Industrial Sector(s) interested in this strategy: Aviation, marine applications, wind industry

References
Shuker, KPN. 2001. The Hidden Powers of Animals: Uncovering the Secrets of Nature. London: Marshall Editions Ltd. 240 p.
Learn More at Google Scholar Google Scholar  

Comments

Login to Post a Comment.

No comments found.

Share

Error - AskNature

We're sorry, but an error has occurred.

Some functionality on AskNature, particularly related to Search and login, breaks somewhat frequently. Although our small team does its best to respond with repairs as quickly as possible, there are often gaps in service that result—and it's likely that you've found one of those gaps!

The Biomimicry Institute is currently rebuilding AskNature from the ground up to be more stable, secure, and user-friendly. If you get value out of AskNature,please consider donating to the Institute in order to see fewer of these error messages in the future.

If you were attempting to search AskNature, please consider using Google to search the site until we get our search engine back up and running:

  1. In a new Google search, enter the following: site:asknature.org [your query]. For example a search for "storing water" would be entered as site:asknature.org storing water.

Have additional questions or want to let us know about something else that went wrong? Please submit a support ticket.